The Stress Of Being A Kicker - Page #1
 

Author: Marc Raj, DO
Co Author #1: Nicholas Goyeneche, MD Ochsner Sports Medicine
Co Author #2: Aaron M. Karlin, MD System Chair -- Dept. of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Section Head -- Pediatric Rehabilitation Director -- Ochsner Concussion Management Program Ochsner Clinic Medical Center
Editor: Michelle Szczepanik, MD

Patient Presentation:
Patient presents to the training room after a football game, without new injury.

History:
Patient is a 17-year-old Division 1 college committed right footed high school kicker/punter who presented to the training room after a Friday night football game. He complained of left sided lower back pain that started insidiously 3 months prior while attending a summer kicking camp. The pain is located over the left lower lumbosacral area. It is an intermittent deep sharp/achy pain that can radiate into left gluteal area. Pain is worse with the follow through of his kicking motion and, more recently, with running. The pain is improved with rest. He denies pain at night, lower extremity paresthesias, weakness, bowel/bladder dysfunction, muscle atrophy, or limb spasticity.

Physical Exam:
6 foot, 205-pound male. Visual inspection of the lumbar spine was unremarkable. Palpation of the lumbar spine revealed tenderness to palpation of the left lower lumbar paraspinals. There was no tenderness to palpation over the left sacroiliac (SI) joint. Range of motion (ROM) was within functional limits. Pain was reproduced with extension and left-sided facet loading. Popliteal angles were 30 degrees bilaterally. Flexion abduction and external rotation (FABER), flexion adduction and internal rotation (FADIR), straight leg raise (SLR), and log roll were negative bilaterally. Negative Trendelenburg noted to either side. Positive Stork test on the left. Muscle strength was 5/5 strength throughout both lower extremities. Muscle stretch reflexes 2+ throughout both upper and lower extremities.

Click here to continue. Challenge yourself by writing down a broad differential diagnosis before moving to the next slide.


NOTE: For more information, please contact the AMSSM, 4000 W. 114th Street, Suite 100, Leawood, KS 66211 (913) 327-1415.
 

© The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine
4000 W. 114th Street, Suite 100
Leawood, KS 66211
Phone: 913.327.1415


Website created by the computer geek